Monday, February 29, 2016

No More Needles? This Laser Can Monitor Your Blood Sugar




A laser that doesn't penetrate the skin could replace painful finger pricking for diabetics.
The new technology, developed by a team at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, incorporates low-powered lasers in a small device that enables continuous blood sugar monitoring. Without the need for an implant, the device may be an ideal type of technology to develop into a wearable system.
























"As well as being a replacement for finger-prick testing, this technology opens up the potential for people with diabetes to receive continuous readings, meaning they are instantly alerted when intervention is needed," said Gin Jose, developer of the technology and professor at the University of Leeds.



A device that suits your lifestyle
The glass used in the sensors, Jose said, acts in a similar way as glass used in smartphones, making it more affordable than some other types of self-monitoring systems.

The team aims to develop two types of devices for consumers: one that is a finger-touch system and another that is a continuous wearable system for ongoing monitoring.

The pilot clinical trial suggests the technology can perform as well as conventional systems, but more research will be done to further develop the product before it's available to consumers.
source:http://www.battlediabetes.com/

Sunday, February 28, 2016

7 Tips for Dealing with Diabetes-Related Fluid Retention




Fluid retention, also known as edema


, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes.

Water retention can occur in any part of the legs, including the feet, ankles, calves and thighs.

There are several reasons why edema occurs, such as fluid buildup or from inflammation in injured or diseased tissue and joints.
Types of Edema

There are three types of diabetes-related fluid retention:

    The first type is called macular edema. Macular edema is a swelling that occurs in the macular, which is near the center of the retina. The retina is responsible for a number of duties such as the ability to read, daytime vision and color reception. Macular edema can cause diabetic retinopathy, which starts with the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. If not treated, this condition can blind a person.


 
















 Pulmonary edema is the second type of fluid retention, which occurs if someone is using certain diabetic medications and if the person has cardiovascular problems. This type of edema can be treated inserting a catheter that drains the fluids.
    Foot and leg edema is the third type of edema and is also the most commonly discussed. Edema in the legs and feet can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds in diabetics. This type of edema is usually treated with manual decongestive therapy and diuretics.

Medication Risks for Edema

People who take thiazolidinedione medications are known to experience water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes as they help the body produce more insulin. However, one of the downsides of this medication is that it can lead to weight gain and edema.
Preventing and Treating Edema

Edema can have a lot of harmful effects if not treated like loss of vision. One of the main ways to stop fluid retention is by keeping your diabetes under control. Occasionally, if the fluid retention is being caused by medication, a change of prescription might be necessary. Having routine screenings can help detect the problem before it becomes more serious.

When the swelling occurs in your ankles or legs, there are many things that you can do to alleviate the symptoms:

   1 Try to prop your feet above your heart to help lessen the swelling. You can use pillows to elevate your feet.

   2 Wear support stockings if you have to be on your feet for extended periods of time.
    Drink plenty of water throughout the day to help flush unnecessary fluids from your body.

  4  Consult your doctor about taking diuretics to help your body get rid of excess fluid.

  5  Exercise can also help with water retention. Light exercises like walking, leg lifts and other similar isometric exercises can help with water retention.

 6   Limit your salt and sodium intake, as this can add to water retention

  7 Avoid standing on your feet for prolonged periods of time.

Sources: Mayo Clinic and DiabeticLive.com

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

10 reasons to give up diet soda




When taken at face value, diet soda seems like a health-conscious choice. It saves you the 140-plus calories you'd find in a sugary soft drink while still satisfying your urge for something sweet with artificial sweeteners like aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose. But there's more to this chemical cocktail than meets the eye.



It confuses your body

Artificial sweeteners have more intense flavor than real sugar, so over time products like diet soda dull our senses to naturally sweet foods like fruit, says Dr. Brooke Alpert, author of The Sugar Detox. Even more troubling, these sugar stand-ins have been shown to have the same effect on your body as sugar. "Artificial sweeteners trigger insulin, which sends your body into fat storage mode and leads to weight gain," Alpert says.
















It could lead to weight gain, not weight loss

Diet soda is calorie-free, but it won't necessarily help you lose weight. Researchers from the University of Texas found that over the course of about a decade, diet soda drinkers had a 70 percent greater increase in waist circumference compared with non-drinkers. And get this: participants who slurped down two or more sodas a day experienced a 500 percent greater increase. The way artificial sweeteners confuse the body may play a part, but another reason might be psychological, says Minnesota-based dietitian Cassie Bjork. When you know you're not consuming any liquid calories, it might be easier to justify that double cheeseburger or extra slice of pizza.

It's associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes

Drinking one diet soda a day was associated with a 36 percent increased risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes in a University of Minnesota study. Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of conditions (including high blood pressure, e

It has no nutritional value

When you drink diet soda, you're not taking in any calories—but you're also not swallowing anything that does your body any good, either. The best no-calorie beverage? Plain old water, says Bjork. "Water is essential for many of our bodily processes, so replacing it with diet soda is a negative thing," she says. If it's the fizziness you crave, try sparkling water.

Its sweetener is linked to headaches

Early studies on aspartame and anecdotal evidence suggests that this artificial sweetener may trigger headaches in some people. "I have several clients who used to suffer from migraines and pinpointed their cause to diet soda," Bjork

It'll ruin your smile over time

Excessive soda drinking could leave you looking like a Breaking Bad extra, according to a case study published in the journal General Dentistry. The research compared the mouths of a cocaine-user, a methamphetamine-user, and a habitual diet-soda drinker, and found the same level of tooth erosion in each of them. The culprit here is citric acid, which weakens and destroys tooth enamel over time.

It makes drinking more dangerous

Using diet soda as a low-calorie cocktail mixer has the dangerous effect of getting you drunk faster than sugar-sweetened beverages, according to research from Northern Kentucky University. The study revealed that participants who consumed cocktails mixed with diet drinks had a higher breath alcohol concentration than those who drank alcohol blended with sugared beverages. The researchers believe this is because our bloodstream is able to absorb artificial sweetener more quickly than sugar.


It's associated with depression

A recent study presented at a the American Academy of Neurology meeting found that over the course of 10 years, people who drank more than four cups or cans of soda a day were 30 percent more likely to develop depression than those who steered clear of sugary drinks. The correlation held true for both regular and diet drinks, but researchers were sure to note that the risk appeared to be greater for those who primarily drank diet sodas and fruit punches. Although this type of study can't prove cause and effect, its findings are worth considering.

It may be bad for your bones

Women over 60 are already at a greater risk for osteoporosis than men, and Tufts University researchers found that drinking soda, including diet soda, compounds the problem. They discovered that female cola drinkers had nearly 4 percent lower bone mineral density in their hips than women who didn't drink soda. The research even controlled for the participants' calcium and vitamin D intake. Additionally, a 2006 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that cola intake (all kinds, not just diet) was associated with low bone-mineral density in women.

It may hurt your heart

Just one diet soft drink a day could boost your risk of having a vascular event such as stroke, heart attack or vascular death, according to researchers from the University of Miami and Columbia University. Their study found that diet soda devotees were 43 percent more likely to have experienced a vascular event than those who drank none. Regular soda drinkers did not appear to have an increased risk of vascular events. Researchers say more studies need to be conducted before definitive conclusions can be made about diet soda's effects on health.
source:http://www.foxnews.com/

7 Day Breakfast Diabetic 1600 calorie menu




1 Cup Skim Milk
1 Plum
Quick Breakfast Taco
MORNING SNACK
2 Whole-Grain Rice Cake
1 Hard Boiled Egg

day 2
1 Cup Skim Milk
1 Banana, small


1 1/2 Cups Bran Flakes Cereal

















day 3

1 Whole Grain Oat Bran Bagel
1 Cup Skim Milk
1/2 Cup Blueberries
1 Tablespoon Creamy Peanut Butter, unsalted
MORNING SNACK
1 Apple, small

day 4

1 Cup Skim Milk
1 Kiwi
1 Cup Whole Grain Flakes Cereal
MORNING SNACK
1 Ounce Walnuts
1 Ounce Dried Fruit

day 5
1 Scrambled Eggs
2 Slices Oatmeal Bread
1 Cup Grapefruit
1 Cup Skim Milk
MORNING SNACK
1 Ounce Whole-Wheat Pretzel

day 6

1 Cup Skim Milk
1 Whole-Wheat English Muffin
1 Tablespoon Creamy Peanut Butter
1 Tablespoon Sugar-Free Jam
MORNING SNACK
1 Orange, medium
1 Fruit & Nut Granola Bar

day7

1 Cup Skim Milk
1 Plum
Quick Breakfast Taco
MORNING SNACK
2 Whole-Grain Rice Cake
1 Hard Boiled Egg

Monday, February 22, 2016

Possible cure for Type1 diabetes in works at Johnson & Johnson and ViaCyte




The cure for Type 1 diabetes is a step closer.

Johnson & Johnson working with a biotech company, ViaCyte, has produced the first stem cell treatment.

This revolutionary treatment could do away with the need for constant blood sugar testing and insulin injections,

It is reported to be the first such medicine.

Mice, which were previously tested, fared well.



















The therapy involves putting embryonic stem cells in a lab dish and turning them into insulin-producing cells. Those cells are then put into a capsule that is implanted under the skin.



The capsule protects the new cells or the immune system would attack them. So far, small groups of patients who began being tested a year ago, were doing well, it was reported Thursday.

After three months, the capsule did what it was supposed to — glommed onto nearby blood vessels and insulin was being produced. There were no adverse side effects.

Another round of a dozen patients will be the next to test this.

Type 1 diabetes, once called juvenile diabetes, is usually found in children and young adults. Only 5% of those who have diabetes have Type 1.

Those with Type 1 do not produce insulin, the hormone needed to break down sugars and starches into glucose. The body needs glucose for energy. People who have Type 1 diabetes must constantly monitor their blood sugar levels.

Some 29 million Americans have diabetes and of those, 1.25 million have type 1.

Johnson & Johnson has been working toward a cure for years. The company and the American Diabetes Association were contacted for comment and have not yet responded.
source:http://www.nydailynews.com/

Sunday, February 21, 2016

Four Herbs That Help With Diabetes Management




A medicinal herb is a plant, or part of a plant, which is used in its entirety to enhance our physical well being. Each herb contains hundreds, sometimes thousands, of naturally occurring chemicals that work together synergistically to help us heal.



Some herbs have been used for millennia to treat illnesses such as diabetes. If you are struggling to maintain good glucose control, or want to strengthen your resistance to diabetes complications, consider talking to your diabetes care team about adding herbal supplements to your daily regimen.




















Your physician or diabetes educator can make sure any herb you take is compatible with your prescription medications, and whether an herb is contraindicated for pregnant women, children, or for those with certain other medical conditions.

Four Helpful Herbs

Here are four diabetes-helpful herbs can be taken alone, or used in combination.

Devil’s Club (Oplopanax horridum) is a member of the ginseng family, and is sometimes called armored ginseng, or northwest ginseng (it grows in the Pacific Northwest). Devil’s club helps balance blood sugar levels, is a calming digestive tonic, and is reported to help some people lose weight.

Goat’s Rue (Galega officinalis) contains a compound called galegine that helps the body balance glucose levels and supports the breakdown and absorption of dietary fats and proteins. In Europe, Goat’s rue has been used for centuries to treat diabetes.

Dandelion root (Taraxacum officinalis) is a gentle, effective liver tonic that aids our body with the elimination of toxins. It also supports the pancreas, and promotes the digestion and absorption of food.

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) has long been used to treat various diseases such as vision problems, headaches, and depression. Gingko helps those with diabetes by stimulating circulation, particularly in the peripheral areas of the hands, feet, eyes, and brain—areas often affected by diabetes-related circulation problems. Some research suggests ginkgo might also help prevent diabetic retinopathy.

Always purchase herbs from a reputable source. Check the label for an expiration date since some herbs lose potency quickly after being dried, and follow the dosage instructions given.

Source: Five Element Healing

Risk for Diabetes to Slash Your Risk for Diabetes




Nine percent of Americans have diabetes. That's 29.1 million people. It's the seventh leading cause of death and costs the U.S. $245 billion annually. Fortunately, you're not powerless against this condition. Plenty of research suggests that there are easy lifestyle steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing diabetes—and this goes beyond the standard recommendations of just lose weight and exercise.



Here are 8 things to incorporate into your life to keep diabetes away.

Eat a Cactus
Yep, there are edible cacti and they can help reduce your risk for diabetes. Mexican researchers found that eating cooked (250 grams, cooked for no longer than 10 minutes) or raw (300 grams) prickly pear cactus pads helped lower glucose peaks. To prepare the prickly pear pad, remove the spines on the flat side with a knife and cut or peel around the narrow edges. This can then be boiled, grilled, or eaten raw.

Cactus plants are also a prebiotic, meaning they help feed the good bacteria in your gut.
















Take a Cold Shower

Taking a cold shower isn't just a good way to wake up in the morning, it will also do the same work that insulin does. " That small bit of cold exposure will use up calories and transform your white fat into brown fat—the kind that helps you lose weight," says Alexa Fleckstein, MD author of The Diabetes Cure. "With the help of a protein called FGF21, which pulls sugars into white cells, where they are turned into energy (instead of just stored, as usual). In effect, FGF21 does the work of insulin—without insulin."


Cut Out Artificial Sugars

Sugar substitutes give you the same sweet taste without the sugar, so they should be good for preventing diabetes, right? Not the case. Research has found that artificial sweeteners may trigger diabetes, because of your gut. In a mouse model, they discovered that artificial sweeteners upset the careful balance of gut bacteria, leading to glucose intolerance.

Spice Up Your Health

Sugar is tasty, but there are so many delicious herbs and spices that can fight diabetes. Dr. Fleckenstein recommends herbs and spices like basil, cinnamon, fennel, and garlic.


Replace One Sugary Beverage

Drinking your sugar is a fast track to diabetes. Research from the Unviersity of Cambridge found that swapping out one sugary drink with water or unsweetened tea or coffee can reduce the incidence of diabetes by 14 percent. The researchers recommend reducing sweetened beverages to 2 percent of your daily calories, or ½ cup of soda per day to prevent 15 percent of new diabetes cases.

Eat Chocolate (for Some)

A study of 18,000 men found that, in those under 65 with a BMI less than 25, eatinc chocolate was linked to lower incidence of developing diabetes over a 9-year period. However, in men with BMI greater than 25, the risk actually increased.

Before you run out and buy a candy bar, keep in mind that sugar has the opposite effect for diabetes, so make sure you pick up dark chocolate without a lot of added sugar.

Go Vegetarian

Giving up meat is as powerful as any oral diabetes medication, says Neal Barnard, MD, researcher and author of Dr. Neal Barnard's Program for Reversing Diabetes. "Medications are virtually always used for the treatment of diabetes and increasingly for the treatment of pre-diabetes," he says. "You can take one medicine for your blood sugar, another one for your blood pressure, another one for your cholesterol, and yet a plant-based diet seems to tackle all of those problems at the same time."

Eat a Big Breakfast and Smaller Dinner

For those who already have diabetes, blood sugar spikes after meals can lead to heart problems. To prevent this, researchers from Tel Aviv University recommend eating more calories at breakfast and fewer calories as the day progresses. Those who had a big breakfast saw 23 percent lower increases in blood glucose levels after lunch than those who had a smaller breakfast.
source:http://www.rodalewellness.com/

Saturday, February 20, 2016

Lunch Box Ideas for Diabetic Kids




During childhood, it can be difficult to have a disease like diabetes which makes you feel left out or different than everyone else. However, this does not have to be the case when it comes to lunch time!

From the beginning, you can help your child make the right decisions regarding his or her diabetes management by showing him or her that it can be fun.



By choosing some healthy, yet still delicious, lunch options for your kid, you can make sure that he or she enjoys the meal while managing blood glucose levels.

The Basics
Protein
To start off the lunch, it is important that you pack some protein to help energize your child without raising his or her blood sugar levels. Some great sources of protein include chicken and turkey slices, tuna, low-fat cheese, beans, and almonds. Having 1/4 cup of protein in your kid's lunch is ideal.


















Whole Grains
A wonderful source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals, whole wheat products are a great addition to your child's lunchbox. The fiber will help to keep your child feeling satiated for the rest of the school day without spiking his or her blood sugar levels. You can do this by using whole wheat bread for the sandwiches and whole-wheat pitas and tortillas for any salad wraps. Whole wheat pasta and brown rice are other possible options.

Fruits and Veggies
Fruits and veggies are important for any meal, but especially for a diabetic. Green vegetables are ideal, such as celery, spinach, broccoli, or asparagus. Fruits can also be added to the lunch, but because of the high levels of sugar in most fruits, they should be eaten in moderation.

Beverage
With all of the sugary drinks marketed to children, it can seem difficult to prevent your kids from buying them. However, by providing healthier alternatives, your kids can get the delicious taste without all of the sugar. Instead of soda, try sugar-free powdered mixes such as Crystal Light. 100% juice is an easy alternative to fruit juices. Swap out 2% milk for low-fat or skim milk.

In addition, water should be the main drink for your child. Continually encourage your child to stay hydrated throughout the day. Send him or her off with a full water bottle for the day to jump-start this healthy habit.

Lunchbox Examples
Here's a week's worth of potential diabetic lunches:

Monday
Turkey sandwich with lettuce and tomato on whole wheat bread
1 cup baby carrots
Low-fat or skim milk
Extra Snack: 1/2 cup of almonds
Tuesday
1/4 cup tuna, 2 tsp low-fat mayo, and cucumbers in a whole wheat tortilla or pita wrap
1 apple
100% orange juice
Extra snack: 1/2 cup of cubed low-fat cheese
Wednesday
2 tbsp hummus spread onto a small, low-carb tortilla. Top with 1/4 of a red sweet pepper, sliced, and 4 chopped cherry tomatoes. Roll up and cut into 1-inch slices. (Depending on the age of your child, 2 of these tortillas may be needed)
1 cup of celery sticks
Crystal light or other sugar-free beverage
Extra snack: low-fat jello
Thursday
1 slice of veggie pizza. Use a thin, whole wheat crust for the pizza and low-fat cheese. Some delicious topping choices include: Sautéed spinach, bell pepper, mushrooms, olives, tomato, broccoli, and garlic
1/4 cup blueberries
100% grape juice
Extra snack: 1/2 cup of fruit mixed in 1/4 cup of cottage cheese
Friday
Thermos of chili or low-sodium soup with 1 serving of high-fiber crackers
1 banana
water with 100% lemon juice
Extra snack: 1-2 cups light air-popped popcorn
Extra "Fun Friday" Dessert: 1 tbsp cranberries or raspberries, 1 tbsp toasted almonds (or other nuts) mixed into 6-ounces plain fat-free Greek yogurt
Source: LiveStrong

Diabetic-Friendly Ways to Start Your Day




No matter how much time you leave yourself for breakfast every morning, there is a healthy breakfast that can be ready when you are.



Why Breakfast is Important

Every person with diabetes knows they must maintain a balanced diet. Breakfast should not be the exception to that rule. A breakfast containing low glycemic foods can help prevent blood sugar spikes for an entire morning. This is one of the results of a study conducted by Purdue University. In their study, almonds were added to a balanced breakfast. Study participants felt more satisfied and had lower blood glucose readings after both breakfast and lunch.




















The other benefit to a healthy breakfast is the boost your metabolism gets to start your day. A revved-up metabolism keeps your energy levels up all day long.

Quick Breakfast Ideas

Breakfast doesn't have to be a big meal. A breakfast shake is a quick item. Start with a container of fat-free yogurt, a half cup of your favorite fruit, a teaspoon of nuts and a teaspoon of wheat germ. Add ice, blend and pour. This is a quick, balanced, take-along meal for those who have next to no time in the morning.

Another quick item is a small container of low-glycemic fruit (berries, peaches, orange, apple) and a handful of whole almonds. Quick, portable and full of fiber, so that you feel full all morning long.

A slice of whole grain toast, topped with 2 tablespoons of natural peanut butter and some slices of banana or apple will give you the energy of protein and the fullness of fiber.

One -half cup of low fat cottage cheese, mixed with 1/2 cup canned peaches, blueberries, strawberries or any other fruit you enjoy is a quick snack or a quick breakfast.

Sit-Down Breakfast Ideas

A bowl of cereal is a great choice for a slower morning. Of course, it is important to choose the right cereal. The cereal, whether hot or cold, should be high in fiber and low in sugar. Oatmeal is a great choice.

Choose the kind that needs to cook for a few minutes, rather than instant oatmeal, which often contains high levels of sugary flavoring. Serve with some fruit and low-fat milk and you will have a satisfying start to your day that will stay with you. Farina (Cream of Wheat) or grits are another good choice. Just be careful not to add fats in the form of butter, whole milk or cream, and use a non-calorie sweetener instead of sugar.

Since you have the time, why not try an egg white omelet? Add a slice of ham and serve with a slice of whole grain toast and you have yourself a satisfying meal.

These are just suggestions. Use your imagination - and your knowledge of what a healthy diabetes meal plan is - and come up with your own ideas!

Sources: Diabetes.org and Everyday Health.com

THIS Breakfast Could Lower Your Diabetes Risk




Things keep looking (sunny side) up for egg lovers: First, the USDA threw out its longstanding recommendation that people eat no more than 300 mg cholesterol a day—now, the organization doesn't set any limit on cholesterol (by the way, one egg has 185 mg). And now, new research published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds that consuming about an egg a day may lower risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D).



Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland recorded the dietary habits of about 2,000 middle-aged men and followed up for a period of about 19 years. What they found was clear: Eating at least a half an egg per day was associated with a 37% drop in T2D risk (compared to eating just one egg or less per week).



















The finding is especially surprising because, for many years, dietary cholesterol has been thought to be a risk factor for T2D—and eggs, of course, are a major source of dietary cholesterol. But the researchers say demonizing eggs for their cholesterol misses the fact that they offer tons of other beneficial compounds, too.

"In addition to high-quality protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, eggs include bioactive compounds like carotenoids, which have been found to have anti-inflammatory properties," says lead author Jyrki K Virtanen, PhD, adjunct professor of nutritional epidemiology at University of Eastern Finland. And inflammation, he points out, is a risk factor for diabetes.

The authors do offer a caveat: It's probably best for people who already have T2D to avoid eggs, since some studies have shown eggs can increase heart disease risk for those who already have diabetes. But if you're otherwise healthy? Stick to about an egg a day and scramble away.
source:http://www.prevention.com/

Friday, February 19, 2016

Tips for Dealing with Diabetes | Caregiver Tips




Marty was diagnosed with diabetes (Type 2) a few years ago. He used to be very active and in shape but after a back injury that resulted in permanent nerve damage, he’s now disabled.  Being disabled has resulted in some health issues including diabetes.  When he was first diagnosed, we did a lot of research on tips for dealing with diabetes. Neither of us had any experience with the disease in the past and learning about it was an eye opener.



Diabetes is really about a lot more than just your blood sugar. I had no idea that it could result in so many different health problems. Diabetes is a metabolic disease where your body cannot produce any (or enough) insulin to regulate your blood sugar. Some people can control it with diet, some with medication and some with insulin shots. Marty takes several prescriptions to control his diabetes and the doctor has warned us to be aware of these issues especially as he ages:
Heart Disease – People with diabetes can have a higher instance of heart disease. Following a heart healthy diet and watching your sugar intake is very important. Marty also takes fish oil to help keep his heart healthy.



Vision Problems – Diabetes can cause blindness and other vision problems. It’s important to have your eyes checked regularly. Marty wears glasses and he sees his eye doctor to monitor any changes in his vision.
Foot Problems – The doctor stressed how important it was to check Marty’s feet regularly for infections or blood flow issues. He applies lotion to his feet each day as he checks for any cuts or problems.

Skin Problems – One of the first problems of diabetes is often skin sores and itching.  Marty uses the Vaseline® Intensive CareTM Advanced Repair Lotion (fragrance free) on his arms and feet to care for them.
Dental Disease – Proper attention to your teeth and gums is important since diabetes can cause gingivitis and periodontitis. Make sure to have regular check ups and cleanings by your dentist.

As a caregiver, part of my job is to help Marty deal with his diabetes. I make sure that he has the tools and information he needs to make good decisions and take care of himself. I try to cook heart healthy meals that he’ll enjoy and keep healthy snacks on hand.

Diabetes really can have a huge impact on your life but following these tips for dealing with diabetes will help you be aware of any potential problems. I picked up the Vaseline® Intensive CareTM Advanced Repair Lotion for Marty at Walmart and he’s really impressed with how moisturizing it is. I love the fact that it has healing qualities and that it helps heal dry skin in just 5 days. Marty doesn’t like lotions with fragrance so this is a great option for him to use. Of course, if you’re like me and you like scent in your lotion, there is a lightly scented version as well.
source:http://confessionsofanover-workedmom.com/


Thursday, February 18, 2016

1,500-Calorie Diabetic Sample Meal Plan




Diet plays a very important role when it comes to managing diabetes. Your food choices, the amount of food you eat and the timing of your meals, all affect your blood sugar. A 1,500-calorie diabetic diet is a lower calorie diet that can help small women who exercise, small or medium-sized women who want to lose weight, and medium-sized women who don't exercise to better manage their blood sugars.



Diabetic Diet Basics

A healthy, 1,500-calorie diabetic meal plan should include a variety of foods from all of the food groups. To keep calories under control and make sure you get all the nutrients you need, eat a set number of servings from each group each day. Evenly distributing your food choices between three meals and three snacks can help you control blood sugar.


















A balanced 1,500-calorie diabetic meal plan includes six servings of starches, three servings of fruit, three servings of milk, four servings of non-starchy vegetables, six servings of meat and four servings of fat per day. One serving of starch equals one slice of bread or one-third cup cooked rice; one serving of fruit equals one small piece of fresh fruit or one-half-cup canned fruit; one serving of milk equals 1 cup of milk or 1 cup of light yogurt; one serving of non-starchy vegetable equals one-half-cup cooked or 1-cup raw; one serving of meat equals 1 ounce of cooked meat and one serving of fat equals 1 teaspoon of oil or butter.


Breakfast
A balanced breakfast consists of one serving of starch, fruit, milk, meat and fat. A sample meal might include one-half of a small bagel topped with 2 teaspoons of peanut butter and one-half of a banana sliced, served with 1 cup of nonfat milk and a hard-boiled egg.

Midmorning Snack
Your mid-morning snack should include one serving of fruit. One small orange or 2 tablespoons of raisins are healthy options.

Lunch
For lunch, include two servings of starch, two servings of meat, one serving of vegetable and one serving of fat. A healthy lunch idea for your 1,500-calorie diabetic meal plan might include an entree salad made with 2 cups of mixed greens topped with 2 ounces of chopped chicken and 2 tablespoons of low-fat salad dressing, and served with 2 cups of a broth-based soup such as vegetable or chicken noodle.

Afternoon Snack

One serving of milk at your afternoon snack keeps energy up and blood sugar steady. Good options might include a sugar-free cappuccino made with 1 cup of nonfat milk or one container of light yogurt.

Dinner

Dinner consists of three servings of meat, two servings of starch, three servings of vegetables, one serving of fruit and two servings of fat. A sample meal might include 3 ounces of grilled salmon with 1 cup of roasted red potatoes tossed with 1 teaspoon of olive oil, 1 cup of steamed broccoli, 1 cup of mixed greens topped with 2 tablespoons of low-fat salad dressing and 1 1 /4 cups of fresh strawberries.

Evening Snack

Finish your day with a healthy evening snack consisting of one serving of starch and one serving of milk. Sample snack options include three-quarter cup of unsweetened whole-grain cold cereal with 1 cup of nonfat milk or five whole wheat crackers with one container of light yogurt.
source:http://www.livestrong.com/

how Do Treat Low Blood Sugar At Night?




It’s the worst. THE WORST! If you are treating your diabetes with insulin, you know what I’m talking about. That feeling when you wake up in the middle of the night soaked in sweat and shaking due to low blood sugar. Your whole body goes into stress mode, and all you can think about is EATING! I absolutely hate it, so I wanted to share my approach on how to treat low blood sugar at night with you guys. I hope this can help some of you and I would love to hear your best advice and tricks as well. If you have a smart way of dealing with nightly lows, please write it in the comments below this post so everyone can learn

So How Do I Treat Low Blood Sugar At Night?
What I do is treat it for what it is, a medical emergency. So I test my blood sugar and immediately eat or drink 8-15 grams of carbs in the form of 2 glucose tablets or 125 ml juice.  I then assess whether I need a low glycemic carb as well (you can read more about low-glycemic carbs here). The assessment is pretty quick, and for me only involves checking that I didn’t bolus within the last 4 hours. If I did, I might have to cover that with a few rice cakes.

The reason why I say 4 hours is because I bolus with Novolog and that stays active in the body for about 4 hours. If it has been more than 4 hours since I took my bolus, I know that just the sugar or juice will get me through the night.

My recommendation is to be honest with yourself, and if you can’t go into the kitchen and just have those 15 grams of carbs without emptying the fridge every time, then keep your emergency carbs in the bedroom next to where you sleep (that’s always a good idea anyway).














I also recommend that you don’t treat your low with candy or cake. As I said, it’s a medical emergency and you need a carb that will hit your blood stream quickly. Pure sugar or juice is the best for that since the fat in candy or cake will slow down carb absorption. Also, you don’t need a treat in the middle of a low blood sugar. You’re not enjoying it anyway, just stuffing your face.

How To Prevent Low Blood Sugars In The Future?
There is probably no way to completely eliminate low blood sugars at night (unless you are on a pump with suspend function) but I have learned to limit them quite a bit.


What I do is pretty simple, I try to learn from my mistakes. If I have a low during the night, I’ll go back and see how my bolus and basal patterns were the day before, what I ate and what Idid.



For example, my last low blood sugar was at 4 am a few nights ago, and when I went back and analyzed the data, this is what I found: Since it was 4 am and my last snack was at 11 pm, the low couldn’t be due to my last bolus. I also hadn’t changed my basal amount. However, I had moved my workout to later in the evening. So my conclusion was that to avoid future nightly lows, I should take less basal insulin before I go to bed if I’m to continue working out later in the evening. That’s a pretty easy fix. I reduced my nightly basal and now I’m sleeping through the night again and waking up with perfect sugars.

Do My Tactics Work Every Time?

HA! No, I still have nights where I go low and nights where I overeat to treat it, but they are really far apart. I’m not perfect, but always analyzing why I had a low and making adjustments going forward has helped a lot in reducing my nighttime lows, and having the right food and drink easily available has helped me treat my lows in the right way.
source:http://thefitblog.com/

7 Day Diabetes 1800 calorie menu




day 1

BREAKFAST
1 Cup 1% Milk
1 Orange, medium
1 1/4 Cups Cheerios Cereal
MORNING SNACK
1 1/2 Cups Cantaloupe Melon
1 Ounce Walnuts
LUNCH
Lemony Lentil Salad with Salmon
1 Whole-Wheat Pita Bread, small
1 Cup 1% Milk
1 Fudgsicle, no sugar added
AFTERNOON SNACK
2 Tablespoons Prepared Hummus
4 Ounces Carrot Sticks
DINNER
3/4 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
1 Cup Steamed Spinach
Chili-Rubbed Steaks & Pan Salsa
Zucchini-Walnut Loaf



day 2

BREAKFAST
1 Cup 1% Milk
1 Banana, small
1 1/2 Cups Bran Flakes Cereal
MORNING SNACK
1 Fruit & Nut Granola Bar
LUNCH
Chopped Greek Salad with Chicken
1 Whole-Wheat Bread
1 Cup 1% Milk
AFTERNOON SNACK
1 Ounce Almonds, salted
2 Tablespoons Raisins
DINNER
Warm Beet & Spinach Salad
South Pacific Shrimp
1 Whole-Wheat Roll
3/4 Cup Cooked Couscous
1 Peach, medium
























day 3
BREAKFAST
1 Whole Grain Oat Bran Bagel
1 Cup 1% Milk
1/2 Cup Blueberries
1 Tablespoon Creamy Peanut Butter, unsalted
MORNING SNACK
1 Apple, small
LUNCH
1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
Baked Chicken with Onions & Leeks
2/3 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
1/2 Cup Fresh Pineapple
AFTERNOON SNACK
1 Cup Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener
DINNER
1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
4 Teaspoons Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
1 Cup 1% Milk
Squash, Chickpea & Red Lentil Stew
1 Nectarine, medium

day 4 

BREAKFAST
1 Cup 1% Milk
1 Kiwi
1 Cup Whole Grain Flakes Cereal
MORNING SNACK
1/2 Ounce Walnuts
1 Ounce Dried Fruit
LUNCH
1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
Tilapia Corn Chowder
4 Teaspoons Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
1 Ounce Oyster Crackers
1 Cup Honeydew Melon
AFTERNOON SNACK
1 Cup Blackberries
1 Cup 1% Milk
DINNER
1 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
Chicken Breasts with Mushroom Cream Sauce
1/2 Cup Steamed Asparagus
Broiled Mango

day 5

BREAKFAST
1 Scrambled Eggs
2 Slices Oatmeal Bread
1 Cup Grapefruit
1 Cup 1% Milk
MORNING SNACK
1 Cup Raspberries
1 Ounce Whole-Wheat Pretzel
LUNCH
1 Cup 1% Milk
1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
Sweet Potato-Turkey Hash
3 Gingersnap Cookies
AFTERNOON SNACK
6 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener
1/4 Cup Alpen Cereal
DINNER
1 Cup Cooked Quinoa
3/4 Cup Cooked Carrots, Sliced
Apple-&-Fennel Roasted Pork Tenderloin
1 Cup Strawberries

day 6 
  • BREAKFAST

    1 Cup 1% Milk

    1 Whole-Wheat English Muffin

    1 Tablespoon Creamy Peanut Butter

    1 Tablespoon Sugar-Free Jam

    MORNING SNACK

    1 Orange, medium

    1 Fruit & Nut Granola Bar

    LUNCH

    1 1/2 Ounces Low Fat Cheddar Cheese

    Southwestern Rice & Pinto Bean Salad

    1 Whole-Wheat Pita Bread, small

    Citrus-Infused Strawberries

    AFTERNOON SNACK

    8 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener

    1 Cup Watermelon

    DINNER

    1 Whole-Wheat Roll

    Pacific Sole with Oranges & Pecans

    3/4 Cup Cooked Brown Rice

    1 Cup Steamed Cauliflower

    1 Cup Grapes


  • day 7




  • BREAKFAST

    1 Cup 1% Milk

    1 Plum

    Quick Breakfast Taco

    MORNING SNACK

    Zucchini-Walnut Loaf

    LUNCH

    1 Veggie Burger

    1 Whole-Wheat Roll

    1 Cup Prepared Coleslaw

    1 Pear, medium

    AFTERNOON SNACK

    6 Ounces Carrot Sticks

    Roasted Eggplant & Feta Dip

    DINNER

    1 Cup 1% Milk

    1 Peach, medium

    2 Cups Tossed Salad Mix

    2 Tablespoons Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing

    Seared Scallops with Brandied Leeks & Mushrooms

    2/3 Cup Cooked Brown Rice

  • SOURCE:HTTP://WWW.EATINGWELL.COM/
  • LOW CARB STRAWBERRY CHEESECAKE SMOOTHIE




    This low carb strawberry cheesecake smoothie whips up in just minutes. It’s even more delicious than combining your favorite milkshake and cheesecake. I know from experience that when living a healthy low carb lifestyle you can often feel like your depriving yourself of things you love, like fruity smoothies and rich cheesecake. That’s why I’ve created this deliciously healthy smoothie.



    Strawberry Cheesecake Smoothie - Great as a filling breakfast or post-workout recovery drink. This low carb smoothie is packed with protein and gives your favorite strawberry cheesecake a run for your money.

























    Do you know what two ingredients make this smoothie low carb friendly and high in protein? Silk Unsweetened Soy Milk and cottage cheese! The best part of using Silk’s unsweetened soy milk is that it’s a fantastic dairy free source of protein and works great for all of my friends who are allergic or aren’t huge fans of almond or coconut milk. As for the cottage cheese, it packs it’s fair share of protein, pairs well with fruits, and makes a decadently creamy smoothie.



    PREP TIME
    5 mins
    TOTAL TIME
    5 mins

    Recipe type: Drinks
    Serves: 1

    INGREDIENTS

    ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese
    2 ounces of cream cheese
    ½ cup strawberries
    4 tablespoons sweetener
    1 cup of ice cubes (2 handfuls)
    ¼ cup Silk Unsweetened Soy Milk
    ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    INSTRUCTIONS

    Add all of the ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth and easily pourable.
    Taste and adjust consistency and sweetness by adding more ice and/or sweetener.
    NOTES
    Serving size: 1 Serving (Total recipe makes 1 servings)
    Protein 17.50g, Cals 370, Fat 24.00, Carbs 12.55g, Fiber 2.50g — NET CARBS: 10.05g

    NOTE: If you cannot consume soy please feel free to sub water or almond milk.
    source:http://the-lowcarb-diet.com/

    Wednesday, February 17, 2016

    7 Day Diabetes 1600 calorie menu




    day 1

    BREAKFAST
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Plum
    Quick Breakfast Taco
    MORNING SNACK
    2 Whole-Grain Rice Cake
    1 Hard Boiled Egg

    LUNCH

    1 Veggie Burger
    1 Whole-Wheat Roll
    1 Cup Prepared Coleslaw
    1 Apricot
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    6 Ounces Carrot Sticks
    French Onion Dip



    DINNER

    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Peach, medium
    1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
    1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
    Roasted Halibut with Banana-Orange Relish
    2/3 Cup Cooked Brown Rice























    day2

    BREAKFAST

    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Banana, small
    1 1/2 Cups Bran Flakes Cereal
    MORNING SNACK
    1 Fruit & Nut Granola Bar

    LUNCH
    Chopped Greek Salad with Chicken
    1 Whole-Wheat Bread
    Vanilla-Orange Freezer Pops
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    1 Ounce Almonds, salted

    DINNER

    Mixed Lettuce Salad with Cucumber Herb Vinaigrette
    South Pacific Shrimp
    1 Whole-Wheat Roll
    1/2 Cup Cooked Couscous
    1 Peach, medium

    day3


    BREAKFAST

    1 Whole Grain Oat Bran Bagel
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1/2 Cup Blueberries
    1 Tablespoon Creamy Peanut Butter, unsalted
    MORNING SNACK
    1 Apple, small

    LUNCH

    1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
    1 Tablespoon Low Calorie Caesar Salad Dressing
    1/2 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
    Green Eggs & Ham Frittata
    1/2 Cup Fresh Pineapple
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    6 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener

    DINNER

    1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
    1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    Vegetable Lover's Chicken Soup
    1 Whole-Wheat Pita Bread, small
    1 Nectarine, medium

    day4

    BREAKFAST
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Kiwi
    1 Cup Whole Grain Flakes Cereal
    MORNING SNACK
    1 Ounce Walnuts
    1 Ounce Dried Fruit

    LUNCH
    1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
    Hungarian Beef Goulash
    1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
    Slow-Roasted Cherry Tomato Bruschetta
    1 Cup Honeydew Melon
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    1 Cup Blackberries
    1 Cup Skim Milk

    DINNER
    2/3 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
    Seared Chicken with Apricot Sauce
    1/2 Cup Steamed Asparagus
    1/2 Cup Mango

    day 5

    BREAKFAST
    1 Scrambled Eggs
    2 Slices Oatmeal Bread
    1 Cup Grapefruit
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    MORNING SNACK
    1 Ounce Whole-Wheat Pretzel

    LUNCH
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
    1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
    Sweet Potato-Turkey Hash
    2 Gingersnap Cookies
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    6 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener
    1/4 Cup Alpen Cereal

    DINNER
    2/3 Cup Cooked Quinoa
    3/4 Cup Cooked Carrots, Sliced
    1 Cup Strawberries
    Apple-&-Fennel Roasted Pork Tenderloin

    day 6

    BREAKFAST
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Whole-Wheat English Muffin
    1 Tablespoon Creamy Peanut Butter
    1 Tablespoon Sugar-Free Jam
    MORNING SNACK
    1 Orange, medium
    1 Fruit & Nut Granola Bar

    LUNCH
    Southwestern Rice & Pinto Bean Salad
    1 Whole-Wheat Pita Bread, small
    Chocolate & Nut Butter Bites
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    8 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener
    1 Cup Watermelon

    DINNER
    Pacific Sole with Oranges & Pecans
    2/3 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
    1 Cup Steamed Cauliflower
    1 Cup Grapes

    day 7


    BREAKFAST
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Plum
    Quick Breakfast Taco
    MORNING SNACK
    2 Whole-Grain Rice Cake
    1 Hard Boiled Egg

    LUNCH
    1 Veggie Burger
    1 Whole-Wheat Roll
    1 Cup Prepared Coleslaw
    1 Apricot
    AFTERNOON SNACK
    6 Ounces Carrot Sticks
    French Onion Dip

    DINNER
    1 Cup Skim Milk
    1 Peach, medium
    1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix
    1 Tablespoon Vinegar & Oil Salad Dressing
    Roasted Halibut with Banana-Orange Relish
    2/3 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
    source:http://www.eatingwell.com/